Sunday, August 19, 2012

Brett and Flash at Posse Training

Guest blogger today:  Brett
 (note to readers: Brett references this short poem, Flash's Mistake, below).

Hello followers of Annette.  Annette has graciously allowed me to be a guest "blogger" for today.  I guess Annette has run out of "blogging" topics rehabbing her foot on the couch.  This, as most of you will recall from previous blogs and "Hoof prints in My Garden", is the fault of my horse Flash, who tried to install, as  best a horse can do, the concept of respect for your elders and leaders.  When her horse, Winston, tried to pass Flash at a canter on a trail ride, Flash did as any parent or adult leader would do; he simply attempted to put Winston  in his place with a short kick to his side.  Unfortunately, Winston, being athletic and young, moved slightly left, and Flash's kick landed on Annette's foot in the stirrup, breaking several toes.  Flash apologized profusely, but the blame was already laid.  "Flash has to be sold".  Yeah, right.  Anyway, that out of the way and the air cleared, this blog is about Flash's day at posse training.

My neighbor and her horse "Tag" who went into "ballistic" bucking mode.

Up at 0430 to feed and try to "muck", wash Flash, load the trailer, and off to posse training in the San Gabriel foothills before the temperature reaches 100 degrees.  This training was an annual certification, but very benign in nature compared to last year.  The sensory obstacles were very boring, and Flash was actually asleep through most of them.  Walk over a teeter totter, across tarps, pass by flapping flags, and stand still while a starter pistol is shot 2' away from your face and behind your butt.  Flash didn't even flinch, his eyes at half mast.

Mounting up, as graceful as a 63 year can be.

boring teeter totter

There was one exciting moment when one of the posse members had to trot her horse to fill in a blank space, and the horse went into ballistic mode and started "rodeo" bucking right next to Flash.  Flash, having learned his lesson about kicking to demand respect and not wanting to be sold, calmly watched as the rider and horse went by.  The rider came off seconds later and Flash went over to see if she was ok while her horse continued bucking big time across the arena.  The rider, (one of my neighbors), went to the hospital and ended up with 3 broken ribs.  Flash felt terrible as though it was his fault for not acting as a responsible adult, and agreed to trailer the injured rider and her horse back home, pending my approval.  I said we could do that.

the posse passing a flag back and forth

finished, time for a drink.

It was a long, hot day, but the best part was when everybody went into town for lunch and I stayed with the horses.  I had put Flash in a small pipe corral, and went over to just hang with him for about 20 minutes.  We stood in the corner of the pipe corral with a warm breeze blowing and me rubbing the bone behind Flash's ear.  Flash was totally relaxed, almost snoring with his back leg cocked and his butt half way to the ground.  He lowered his head and leaned it against the pipe corral, right next to my head and we bonded for at least 15 minutes.

Yeah buddy, NOBODY is going to sell you!

12 comments:

  1. sweet unflappable boy! the toes were just an honest mistake, certainly... :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. that sounds like so much fun.

    I am sure that Annette didn't mean it. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. You are an amazing horse Dad and Flash should get an extra apple for his great performance (albeit half asleep). Thanks for guest blogging!

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's so much fun here, and very risky too! A rough and tough calling can be most rewarding. Glad Flash stays! Very informative write Brett and thanks Annette for sharing!

    Hank

    ReplyDelete
  5. Bravo Brett! Loved reading this just as much as all the post from Aspen Meadows. That Flash is quite the horse : )

    ReplyDelete
  6. That looks like a really fun experience. And we know Flash didn't mean to do it. Annette, I so hope those toes will heal soon. Seems like forever. How high up in the mountains do you live? We're at 4,141 ft according to Google Earth. And we have plenty of jack rabbits some years, they come and go. I learned that rabbit populations are cyclical in nature.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Come on Brett...she was only kidding and knows how much you love that horse. He really is a sweet boy. Hopefully Annette will be back in the saddle very soon. This summer has been a pain in the (butt) foot. You are both very caring and responsible horse owners!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well, of course Flash isn't for sale! It's not his fault Annette got her toes in the way of his hoof, lol!

    ReplyDelete
  9. lol! What Terry said. Flash had no control over where Annette's toes were. He's a keeper, for sure! Love those bonding moments, even more meaningful because you chose to be with your buddy over hanging out with a bunch of the Posse for lunch.
    Too bad the one rider had to get hurt, though. Sure goes to prove that horses will sometimes do the unexpected. Kudos on your for wearing a helmet when so many riders don't/won't, especially men.

    ~Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  10. Flash knows that accidents happen and I'm sure he's sorry. Looks like he did really well at the posse training. He's such a gentleman for helping the injured rider and her horse. I think everyone knows his place at home is secure. Hope Annette's toes are feeling much better by now.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for commenting! I love the conversation.